Language Development and COVID19

The “new norm” of saying “Hello” and “Good-bye”

Language impaired children often have trouble interpreting facial expressions. Increasing numbers of states may be required that everyone except for those under the age of two wear masks. How will this affect social skills? Reading the emotions of others is so important to be able to communicate with each other

Language is changing in terms of interpretation of facial expressions – after all we are wearing masks hopefully more often than not at this time. Teaching emotions and interpreting them will change so please click on this link to learn some tips. A literal visual picture will be worth a thousand words! https://challengingbehavior.cbcs.usf.edu/docs/Wearing-Masks_Story.pdf

Learn about how to help your children interpret emotions underneath those masks

Helping Children Understand Emotions When Wearing Masks
Young children look for emotional cues from caregivers to help interpret the environment and rely on their caregiver’s facial expressions, tone of voice, and body posture to identify and understand emotions. Here are tips and ideas for helping children identify emotions when your face, your most expressive feature, is covered by a mask. Use these strategies to let children know that behind the mask, a kind and warm expression is still there!

  1. Practice emotional expressions with a mask on in front of a mirror. Pay attention to facial cues that can be seen, body movements, and hand gestures.
  2. Incorporate ASL when teaching emotions
    (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=91foGHKuwL0).
  3. Direct children to look at your eyebrows, eyes, body movements, and gestures when talking about emotions. For example, “Look, I am happy.
    You can’t see my mouth smile, but my cheeks lift up, my eyes crinkle, and my shoulders and arms look like this.”
  4. Increase the use of gestures throughout the day and when talking
    about emotions (e.g., shoulders shrugged for sad, arms out to indicate
    a happy mood).
  5. Talk about your feelings as much as possible (e.g., “I am feeling happy that it is almost time to go outside and play.”; “I am feeling sad that it is raining right now.”; “I am feeling excited that we have a new toy in centers today.”).
  6. If using an emotion check-in, encourage all adults in the classroom to participate and check-in when the children do (https://challengingbehavior.cbcs.usf.edu/docs/FeelingFaces_chart_template.pdf).
  7. When talking about emotions, hold up the corresponding emotion card or visual near your face. Consider wearing a lanyard with a visual of an emotion expressions (e.g., tired, happy, excited, sad, angry, mad, nervous).
  8. Be sure to face children and remain nearby when talking to them while wearing a mask. Wearing a mask muffles the speaker’s speech, which can make it more difficult to understand what is said.
  9. Provide an activity for children to practice wearing a mask and making different faces while looking in a mirror or at each other. Point out how their face looks (e.g., eyes, eyebrows).
  10. Allow children to use masks during play with stuffed animals to help familiarize them with seeing masks in their environment.
  11. Reference: National Center for Pyramid Model Innovations | ChallengingBehavior.org
    The reproduction of this document is encouraged. Permission to copy is not required. If modified or used in another format, please cite original source. This is a product of the National Center for Pyramid Model Innovations and was made possible by Cooperative Agreement #H326B170003 which is funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. However, those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.
    Pub: 06/26/20

Please keep the conversation going and post how you an your children are changing how you are interacting with others. How is language changing for your family???

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Summer Tech Use?

On Facebook recently, I read the following question from a parent and had some ideas about what might be helpful:

“Anyone had success in detaching their kids from the electronic world? I have a huge concern about what this is doing to my 2 boys with multiple letters in their diagnosis…I am afraid our summer is a battle and competition with it.😑”

There is cause for concern, battles aside. According to How Technology Hinders People with ADHD: “Technology use requires balance and self-monitoring. It can be beneficial to utilize the available software to help increase productivity, but also to help decrease distraction and hyper-focus”.

The American Academy of Pediatrics provides guidelines for the use of technology that might be worthwhile to consider.

Create a Family Media Plan.

Create three rules:

RULE ONE

“Pick One Piece of Technology to Use Today for .. (time limit) ) Pick one i.e. kindle, i-pad, computer, etc,

You might want to define clearly on a color coded wipe off board or schedule such as this for each child:

Monday =Kindle Fire;

Tuesday = iPad etc. I might want to rotate every day of the week. Monday may be kindle day, Tuesday could be i-pad day etc.

RULE TWO

Plan Media Viewing: Here is a list of acceptable programs or … decide together what will be watched (you as a parent are responsible for how technology is used and viewed at home)

RULE THREE

Talk about what you have watched with mom/dad

Technology Can Facilitate Social Interaction Graphic

**The research shows that children of different ages understand ond process what they view on computers or other electronic devices best if you as an adult watch it with them and then discuss what is being viewed.

The Ready to Learn Television Program

The Ready to Learn Program: 2010-2015 Policy Brief, published in March 2016, summarized ED’s Ready to Learn Television program research on the effectiveness of three educational television production organizations.53 The brief reported on 15 effectiveness/summative research studies with children aged 3-8 using media in informal learning settings (such as after school or child care programs); 7 of the studies focused on learning at home. From the 7 studies that focused on learning at home, positive associations were found between at-home engagement and children’s math learning with children whose parents received interventions such as content guides and suggestions for supplemental activities. The studies also found that parents’ awareness of children’s math learning increased their likeliness to engage in activities and strategies to help their children learn math.

On a personal Note:

On this Father’s Day, I remember the house rule in my family. Each of the three of us siblings was allowed to watch television for one hour per day. The rule was so ingrained into my daily life that I can even recall the names of the shows I watched and the time of day. It was always for an hour in the morning before school. It was a relaxing way to start the day. Of course, the time of day changed with advancing childhood years.

There were exceptions to that rule: My parents allowed us additional time if we had to watch something on television for school OR if there was a special program – for example watching “The Wizard of Oz” as a family was a big deal for us. It was, after all, a simpler time. Another such special additional viewing that stands out is the night that Neil Armstrong landed on the moon. The LM landed on the Moon at 20:17:39 GMT (16:17:39 EDT) on 20 July 1969. That was special!… so special that we went to the neighbor’s house to watch together. We went there because they had a color television set and I imagine my parents wanted to share the occasion with other adults. For some reason, one of those memories as a little girl was that of dad carrying me home really comfortable in his arms, because I fell asleep right after the landing.

The beauty of this rule is a child was that I was forced to develop other interests and had to learn what else I could do in my free time. Mom was a librarian so we spent a lot of time picking out books and reading. I’d read two or three books at a time. I set up lemonade stands, rode my bike, learned how to draw, and write poetry. During the summer, we went to the pool. We traveled as a family, as we got older and actually may do so even now, periodically as adults. It builds bonds by sharing face time. The challenge comes when you sit down to eat and the phone has to go in a basket, away from everyone and the game is who can stay away from their phone for the longest! Technology can really be addictive!

Finally – for additional thought on the topic of how we use the brain and how it develops take note of this article and perhaps build reading time into your family’s regular routine:

https://medium.com/@alltopstartups/the-reading-brain-why-your-brain-needs-you-to-read-every-day-f5307c50d979#:~:text=Our%20brains%20change%20and%20develop%20in%20some%20fascinating%20ways%20when%20we%20read.&text=Reading%20involves%20several%20brain%20functions,something%20as%20by%20experiencing%20it.

Back to School?

What a challenging prospect in times of a pandemic.  It’s a tough decision in terms of how to educate your child whenever schools open up. Both kids and parents will have feelings. Nobody seems to be considering that, in my opinion.  There are novel CDC guidelines. In case you missed them, here is a link CDC Guidelines   Other thoughts are outlined by the  American Academy of Pediatrics. 

For starters:  How do you explain coronavirus?  In very simple terms

Your child is entitled to additional services in terms of having lost much therapy time if they have an Individualized Education Plan (IEP)? Check with the school special education supervisor and/or the principal.

and finally, how do you deal with the emotions that kids may experience when potentially planning for the first day back if that is your decision?  There are some ideas below:

Resources:

Know Your Rights for a Special Needs Child https://www.familyequality.org/2020/03/30/special-education-rights-during-covid-19-pandemic/

Dealing With Anxiety-Helping Kids Cope:

Give toddlers tools to ease anxieties and worries and feel better again. It’s normal for toddlers to worry and feel anxious—they have enough …
 
For older children
 
 

Speaking About Unspeakable History

What King said in a 1967 speech, titled “The Other America,” was:

Certain conditions continue to exist in our society, which must be condemned as vigorously as we condemn riots. But in the final analysis, a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it that America has failed to hear? … It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met.

Yesterday morning, my now adult son came in and asked if I had heard about those who had been looting at stores a few blocks from us.  “No”, I replied.

Fast forward to Monday evening at about 8:15pm.  It HAD BEEN silent for about an hour prior to this. Curfew was about to fall for the first evening, at 8pm.

silencce redefined

There were no car horns, no busses, no people talking, nobody at the college across the street, no street vendors, or people talking as they exit the subway below me.  You could hear a few birds outside the window and feel the wind. The city air was crisp and fresh.  Then… the roar of protestors outside and all around my home in NYC. The noise was so loud that I had to check outside. I took my camera and recorded this moment in history that will be written about and talked about in years to come.  I then went back to resume attendance at a Zoom meeting in which we were having a discussion around processing the impact of the death of George Floyd this week. I shared what I had witnessed.  All this while hearing protestors outside

The silence of a few minutes earlier had been shattered.

How do we explain racism and injustice to others?  It is as perplexing as the time on 9-11 when my then six-year-old son asked what happened? I had walked across Central Park to pick him up from school where he had not been told anything. That was another point in time when you didn’t know how to explain events.  The first thing I could think of without a second thought was the truth. It was hard to hide since all around us was the smell of smoke.  Helicopters were overhead. Simply said for a six-year old’s comprehension “bad guys in airplanes hit the world trade center and it is on fire”.  He knew what the buildings were. He had seen them in the skyline a few weeks earlier from the Statue of Liberty.   This was a fact.

Here are some ideas for explaining the concept to  explain racism to kids

For adults ..LEARN because the more you know and internalize, the easier it MAY be to explain this within your family.  For starters, the NYT published an “anti-racist” reading list   

For kids on June 6, 2020

standing tall

Can You Hear Me?

Homes with multiple children and pets can be hectic and loud, requiring extra attention to everyone and stressful for families. Especially being at home at this time, being mindful of your child’s ability to hear will be especially important.

Infants

Ear infections are more frequent in babies who have hearing aids because fluid becomes trapped in the middle ear due to the earmold. Consider that it will be helpful to have a prescription for alleviating eat pain and infection.

Baby Hearing Protection - How to Protect Your Baby's Hearing
https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.babyhearing.org%2Fprotect-hearing&psig=AOvVaw1JEy4_AdF-jaVaOBs-Fzo3&ust=1589143947716000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CLsBEK-JA2oXChMIkJf_1tSn6QIVAAAAAB0AAAAAEAQ

Preschool – School Aged Children:

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With older children, who are remote learning, are the batteries working? Have extra ones on hand. because without working these may be affecting a student’s ability to concentrate and complete their work. A number of different ways of enhancing hearing function are detailed in a scholarly article published in ASHA’s American Journal of Audiology. Consider that there are headsets with a feature to help them. Your child may not necessarily tell you; but in this state of crisis at home and in the community this isn’t something to forget. If you are stressed and your child is not looking at you or responding to you for example auditory function may be compromised. Are they pulling at their ear and fussy? Consider that hearing may be a factor.

The Best Hearing Aids for Kids and Teens
https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fphysicianshearingservices.com%2Fblog-posts%2Fthe-best-hearing-aids-for-kids-and-teens&psig=AOvVaw01fLSAa6WSE0dpsSjbqcJs&ust=1589143544984000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=2ahUKEwiqsJ6V06fpAhVDBd8KHaBiDf8Qr4kDegUIARDWAw

ASHA encourages everyone to enjoy these devices safely by taking three basic steps:

  • lower the volume
  • limit the time spent listening
  • wear earphones that go around the ear or fit deeper into the ear to better isolate wanted sound and reduce the need to increase the volume

Referenced in articles published by the American Speech Language Hearing Association, Alexa Skill Blueprints may be helpful for your school aged child who needs to complete homework. https://blueprints.amazon.com/home As an example, the program can create a spelling test

ALL BLUEPRINTS

The Spelling Bee Icon

The Spelling Bee

Create an interactive spelling bee themed tale.MAKE YOUR OWN

Hear a sample of The Spelling Bee

“Alexa, open the Spelling Bee”

Alexa: Welcome to the Spelling Bee. This story has three blanks in it. To change a blank, say ‘Alexa, undo.’ Let’s get started. Please say a child’s name.

“Aloise”

Alexa: You said Aloise. Ok. […] Are you ready to hear your story?

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is FTU_Logo._CB1558396165_.png

HOW TO CREATE

  1. Get inspired by the sample story
  2. Customize it, or start from scratch
  3. Drop in sound effects, fun expressions, and pauses
  4. Create interactive “blanks” to fill in while you listen
  5. Pick a name for your skill
  6. Give your child access to this skill in FreeTime. Go to Amazon Parent Dashboard, tap on the settings icon next to your child’s name, select Add Content, go to the Alexa Skills tab, and then toggle your Blueprint skill on

HOW TO USE

Gather your audience. When you play the story, Alexa asks listeners to fill in the blanks and then reads the story.

Resource:

Home Friendly Preschool Activities

Continuing with information about language activities at home during this Better Speech and Hearing Month is an article that i am sharing from https://www.asha.org for your review.

At Home With Young Children? Build Preschoolers’ Speech and Language Skills With Everyday Interactions and Activities

At Home With Young Children? Build Preschoolers’ Speech and Language Skills With Everyday Interactions and Activities

As families around the country shelter in place, parents of preschoolers can help build their child’s speech and language skills during everyday activities at home.

Strong speech and language skills are key to kindergarten readiness and a precursor for reading, writing, and social success. Below are some key communication skills for children ages 3–5, and suggestions for how parents can help their preschoolers:

1. Following Directions

Teach or reinforce ways to follow directions throughout the day. Get your child’s attention, make sure they are looking at you, and go over the steps you take when getting dressed, washing hands, brushing teeth, or cleaning up toys. You can even create a picture or sign with the list of steps for common daily tasks. Some easy at-home practice opportunities include the following:

  • Cooking and baking. Pick a simple recipe, and have your child help gather the ingredients. Some recipes have pictures of ingredients, making them easier to find. Talk about what you do first, second, and so on. Children can also learn about numbers and measurements while cooking.
  • Scavenger hunt. Hide 10 of your child’s favorite items throughout your home or yard—and create a simple checklist. Can they find and mark them off the checklist of pictures and/or words? Help them as they hunt to find all 10. You can give clues like “move five steps closer” and “move forward.”
  • Classic games. Games such as Simon Says or Red Light, Green Light help your child listen, pay attention, and move while following one- and two-step directions.

2. Learning Songs and Rhymes

Young children love music. Singing nursery rhyme songs like Row, Row, Row Your Boat and Wheels on the Bus teaches them about different sounds and words. Singing songs and hearing rhymes will help children learn to read.

3. Building Vocabulary and Describing Objects

The more words a child is exposed to, the more words they’ll know! Keep the conversation going all day long, regardless of your activity. Some great vocabulary-building opportunities include the following:

  • Puzzle time. Have your child pick out a puzzle. Talk about the pictures on the box. What new words can be found in the puzzle? Find puzzles that have different themes, like holidays, animals, or foods.
  • Crafting. Set up a station with art materials, and talk as you make a craft. Discuss what they want to make, color choices, and the feel of the materials (like Play-Doh or clay).
  • Nature walk. There is so much to talk about outside! What do they see and hear? Do they feel a breeze? How do flower petals smell? How many colors do they see? What are the birds and squirrels doing? Ask them to tell you more.

4. Telling Stories

Set the stage for a story by naming a place, character(s), and activity. Encourage your child to create a story from those details and to make up adventures for each character. The funnier or wilder, the better.

You can also pick a familiar book and have them describe how the characters feel. Magazines and newspapers are also great for this purpose. Make up a story about a picture, and describe what happens. Role-play the stories by pretending to be the characters.

5. Describing Emotions

Help children to express their own feelings and to talk about how others might be feeling. Some ideas include the following:

  • Host an arts-and-crafts show for family members you live with, and display your child’s creations. Use household items (e.g., coffee filters, paper towel rolls, or clothespins) or items from outdoors (e.g., sticks, leaves, rocks) to create the crafts. Ask your child to describe their art, why they chose their subject, and how it makes them feel.
  • Show your child photos of family gatherings or events, and talk about the people in the pictures—who’s who, what they’re doing, and how everyone may be feeling. Talk about how it feels when you are with friends. What makes a good friend?
  • Use dolls or make puppets out of household materials, and stage a show. Use funny voices, and talk about the characters—who they are, what they like or want, and how they feel.

6. Sequencing and Predicting

Sequencing is breaking down something (e.g., a task or story) into steps or parts—and then putting them in a logical order. Ask your child to select a favorite book. Read it together, and then talk about it. What came first? Next? Last? Have them draw a picture to show you. As you read, you can also ask them what they think will happen next—or what they think the story is about before you read by looking at the cover (this is called prediction).

7. Persuading

Children use many tactics to get their way. Although these tactics may include crying or whining, you can help them learn to persuade with their words. Have them draw a picture of their favorite book and tell you about it—are they able to convince you to read it? Or if they want to watch a TV show or movie, ask them to persuade you—to give you good reasons why they should get to watch the show.

8. Summarizing

Schedule a call (or video chat, if you can) between your child and their grandparent, other family members, or a friend to talk about their daily activities or a book they’ve read. Can your child talk briefly about the highlights of the day or the main events in a book?

Additional Resources for Parents are available at https://www.asha.org under these terms:

Communicating With Baby: Tips and Milestones Birth to Age Five

How Does Your Child Hear and Talk?

Preschool Language Disorders

Virtual Schooling Tips

In a challenging time for the ability to educate your child, parents are struggling in the manner in which children have to learn. With this being Better Speech and Hearing Month (BHSM), this second BSHM post relates to how you can better help your child (and yourself) succeed at tele-schooling.

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Additional Resources
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/07/business/school-education-online-money.html?fbclid=IwAR2l9NACDI_so_6leaGM1uCgBgmZ-8EPxknSxHYy2yJM5jyzWnvfy3T4sCY

LANGUAGE ACTIVITIES

May is Better Speech and Hearing Month. This is a month designed to educate others about these areas and provide resources. Well… during this COVID 19 declared state of emergency, families have inquired about the need to structure time at home. In response to this concern, I am posting ideas and include some links at the bottom of this post that may be of help.

Thanks to the American Speech-Language Association https://www.asha.org for the information contained in this post and the photo above. In addition, I’ve included a few related resources at the end which found and think may be useful for others

Ten Ways Children With Language Disorders Can Maintain Both Physical Distance and Social Connection During the Coronavirus Pandemic

With social distancing (or more accurately, physical distancing) a new way of life during the COVID-19 pandemic, people of all ages are challenged to find different ways to connect socially. However, for children with language disorders—who have difficulties with social interactions in the best of times—the physical distance mandated to prevent the pandemic’s spread can be especially challenging.

Sheltering-in-place is encouraging people to find resourceful and creative ways to extend and strengthen their social bonds. Children and adults are using video platforms for playdates, happy hours, and meetings; sharing relatable memes and jokes through email, social media, and texting; attending streamed worship services, fitness classes, and art and music lessons; and more.

However, children with language disorders may not be able to adapt as quickly as others. Parents can help their children interact socially during this time in the following ways:

  1. Screen time. Realistically, screen usage will increase while people are sheltering at home. Some research shows that screen time can lead to speech and language delays in children. But TV shows, movies, and social media can be viewed in a way that optimizes social interaction. When possible, use these technologies interactively: Watch shows/movies together, and discuss them (e.g., Who was your favorite character? What do you think will happen next? Why did the show end that way?). Ask kids to introduce you to their favorite video game or TikTok personality.
  2. Conversation opportunities. Although families may be together more than usual, parents may be focused on financial, medical, work, and other significant responsibilities and concerns. But conversation-rich opportunities can occur in everyday tasks that are already occurring, such as cooking/dinner prep (following a sequence of steps) or traditional activities that families are rediscovering as everyone hunkers down (e.g., board games offer a chance to talk about rules and turn-taking).
  3. Reading. This time of relative isolation can lend more time for reading. But this doesn’t have to be a solitary activity. Families can read to each other and find different types of books online. Young children can play rhyming and word games. Parents can ask older children questions to guide their understanding (e.g., What happened at the beginning, middle, and end of the story? What was the main plot? What motivated each character?)
  4. Being with friends and family. The importance of communicating with friends and extended family during this time cannot be understated. Children with language disorders may find the phone and FaceTime/Zoom communication more challenging than others. Parents can practice conversations in advance and can suggest topics and related responses (e.g., making comparisons between the weather in different cities; talking about home school experiences). They can involve siblings and discuss ways that they can help their sibling who has a language disorder.
  5. Understanding changes. The changes in daily routines may be particularly hard for children with language comprehension and production problems. They may hear alarming news reports or sense the tension of their parent(s)—but they may not have the ability to ask their questions, express their feelings, or speak about this confusing time. Parents can define new vocabulary words (e.g., coronavirus, COVID-19, social distancing, quarantine, sheltering at home) and can explain changes in routine. Parents can establish a new routine, as much as possible, and can involve a child in decision making (e.g., When would you like to call grandma and pop-pop? Which friend should we talk to today? What food would you like?). 
  6. Creativity. Dance, music, art, and other classes that kids may have been taking in person are now virtual, offering a great opportunity to continue the connection with those teachers and friends. And online drawing, cooking, and other tutorials are plentiful. Low-tech possibilities to use creativity and practice language skills include having a child pick out items around the house and create their own store; planning an indoor camping night (e.g., making a list of what they’ll need, ideas for things they want to do); and planning and planting a garden.
  7. Physical activity. Gyms, personal trainers, and community fitness programs are providing content online. Parents and children can use these activities as a way to bond together and as topics of conversation (e.g., different types of exercises, healthy eating, the connection between physical activity and wellness). Or they can take up a new form of exercise and learn it together via televised on-demand or online programs (e.g., family yoga). Some family-friendly neighborhoods have organized circuit training stops at various houses (posting a different exercise on each front/garage door) so families can get in shape and share a neighborhood-based social activity without actually interacting physically.
  8. Humor. Many people have been sharing or receiving humorous COVID-related memes and videos to ease tension and connect with others. Children with language disorders may miss some of these coping opportunities because they tend to miss the nuances of humor. Parents can help them better understand humorous anecdotes or jokes by talking through them. Jokes are a sophisticated form of communication—what a great learning opportunity!
  9. Organizing. Some households are undertaking to declutter and organizing projects that have been on the back burner for years. These can be language lessons, too. What items go together? Do you remember when you wore that outfit? Will you play with that toy anymore?
  10. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Some children with language disorders use AAC to help them communicate (e.g., letter boards, speech-generating devices). Parents should make sure that kids are using their AAC devices at home, at all times. These devices are not just for school.

Although this is no doubt a difficult time for all, parents can help children with language disorders to keep a safe physical distance without losing social nearness that is so critical to their development. 

Note: This is a modified version of a post originally published via the ASHA Leader Live blog.  

LEADER LIVE

Additional Resources:

Creating a family media plan https://www.healthychildren.org/English/media/Pages/default.aspx

Having Conversations http://resourcesforearlylearning.org/educators/module/20/7/19/

https://www.playworks.org/resource/34-conversation-starters-for-your-family/

Reading Books: https://www.rd.com/culture/read-books-for-free-online/

https://www.nypl.org/books-more/recommendations/best-books/kids

Educational Games Online

https://pbskids.org/curiousgeorge/busyday/bugs/

https://pestworldforkids.org/

COVID 19 with ASD or not

 

While walking in Central Park, I’ve noticed few if any children wearing masks. Did I wonder why? Indeed the answer is yes because I have seen this before and wondered.  After returning from my walk, completing some additional work I went digging and found that there are ways to protect your infant or toddler as well, in modified form. https://www.today.com/parents/cdc-says-children-should-wear-masks-slow-covid-19-spread-t178005masks.

Unfortunately, the issues connected with those experiencing symptoms of Autism this period of a pandemic may be extra-challenging. In this last weekend of Autism Awareness Month, I had some suggestions for families in terms of managing this stressful time with your special needs child or even an adult. Information about Support for Individuals with ASD: Coping with Family and Virtual Interactions During COVID-19 may be helpful to peruse: https://www.autism.org/covid-19-resources/ https://www.autism.org/covid-19-resources/

The symptoms of COVID 19 may be different in children in that they might be milder. That said it’s a good idea to be familiar with them. In children with COVID‐19 J Med Virol. 2020 Mar 31. doi: 10.1002/jmv.25807. [Epub ahead of print] She J1Liu L2,3Liu W1,2,3 the following symptoms were reported in children

 

  • fever and cough are the most common clinical manifestations, with some accompanied by fatigue, body aches,
  • nasal congestion,
  • runny nose,
  • sneezing,
  • sore throat,
  • headache,
  • dizziness,
  • vomiting, and
  • abdominal pain.

For those of you reading this who may benefit from visuals about this topic, the following video link regarding the symptoms of the virus in kids is available at HEALTH.COM  

With challenges in the economy, face masks are easy to make on your own with materials for which you don’t have to get outside.

My wishes and hope for safety as we work through this period…..

Additional Resources

[

**COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov .
Get the latest research from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus.

 

Related Link: