Memory and Autism

photo of girl sitting near christmas tree
Photo by Jonathan Borba on Pexels.com

For those who see that all in their child with Autism is bleak – please see a light of strength that they may possess.  The challenge to consider is how to use this productively:

“Visual memory for some types of material has been found to be an area of strength for children with autism but complexity of the stimuli appears to affect memory function in this modality as well. Interestingly, the right hemisphere may compensate for Visual memory for some types of material that has been found to be an area of strength for children with autism but the complexity of the stimuli appears to affect memory function”  (Prior & Chen, 1976).

With this knowledge – take a look at the text and alphabet letters that were duplicated from memory by an autistic individual who had viewed this page in the book Chicka Chicka Boom https://www.amazon.com/Chicka-Boom-Board-Book/dp/1442450703 Book/dp/1442450703    Hayden Gonzales posted this to Facebook on December 26, 2019. Thank you for bringing this to light!

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom is an easy story whose words are marvelous for teaching young children the alphabet. In fact, the following link provides some information about how the book can be used to elicit language development http://doodlebugshomeschool.blogspot.com/2011/08/chicka-chicka-boom-boom-with-l

No photo description available.No photo description available.

 

https://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/neu-20121.pdf   “memory in autism appears to be organized differently than in normal individuals — reflecting differences in the development of brain connections with the frontal cortex”.

The post brought to mind my first cousin. Jerry was diagnosed with autism at a very young age and at a point when not much was known about the disorder.  He would memorize calendars and could tell you what day of the week you were born on, for example, four or even five years ago.  How remarkable, I thought. I wondered why – perhaps research now is answering that question.

What Is Declarative Memory? This is an area of strength in those who are autistic.  \

Your ability to recall addresses, locations of parking garages, intersection names, phone numbers, and an experience that you had at a restaurant are all a part of declarative memory. Declarative memory, also referred to as explicit memory, is the memory of facts, data, and events. For example, let’s say that you know that your favorite restaurant is only open until 6 PM on Sundays. The time that the restaurant closes is stored as a declarative memory. We can consciously recall declarative memory. Declarative memory is a type of long-term memory.  Here is a functional strategy that may be useful for daily activities that require this:

http://autism.sesamestreet.org/daily-routine-cards/?fbclid=IwAR0VKcWb_ZAHzheWdgT7ekqhwG_NuW8JLOMtCHZyT4PnolRXeyq6oeXxLSw

Declarative memory seems to help individuals with autism compensate for social deficits by memorizing scripts for navigating social situations. It supports the learning of strategies to overcome language or reading difficulties not only in autism, but also in SLI and dyslexia. And it appears to help people with OCD or Tourette syndrome learn to control compulsions and tics.

black and white blackboard business chalkboard
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

References:

https://study.com/academy/lesson/declarative-memory-definition-examples-quiz.html

https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2006/01/autism

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autism_and_memory

Read the journal article

Prior MR, Chen CS. Short-term and serial memory in autistic, retarded, and normal children. Journal of Autism and Childhood Schizophrenia. 1976;6:121–131. [PubMed[]

http://www.judyendow.com/sensory-solutions/autism-and-the-sensory-system-part-6-of-8/

 
 
 

  Lindsay Strachan Fofana Thank you for this! My almost 4 year old son is receptive and expressive language delayed but loves to learn and seemingly has photographic memory. Yesterday he spelled his name backwards. I explained to him what he had done and he was tickled! It’s very promising and always exciting.

A Decade of Changed Communication

pexels-photo-769525
Photo by Rakicevic Nenad on Pexels.com

Welcome to a new decade!   Where have you been and where you will go this year. I hope my readers will be able to increase their connectivity to others and opportunities to engage with those in many different venues.  As you do so- pause and think about how we are doing so. My question to you is where did talking face-to-face vs. FaceTime go?

Changes Over a Decade in How We Talk:  

Absolutely fascinating how it seems that social media has taken over so much of our means of communicating with one another! Take a look at the statistics https://www.oberlo.com/blog/social-media-marketing-statistics and recall that social media only became a phenomenon of the late 1900s.  Remember the movie “Social Network” and how famous Mark Zuckerberg became as a result?

Now he has new plans https://time.com/facebook-world-plan/

Cell phone usage has changed us too.  At the very bottom of this post, there is a link noting the evolution of this type of communication.

July 14, 2015, the following was published http://attentiv.com/we-dont-speak/  Text messaging leads to abbreviated speech. We can avoid faces by merely looking at a screen.  Fewer verbal productions are heard, and the duration of these discussions is shorter.  The way in which we “talk” has changed  and is different cross-generational groups October 17, 2016, the following was published:  https://www.languagetrainers.co.uk/blog/2016/10/17/with-texting-and-social-media-are-people-really-speaking-less/

August 24, 2018, an article was published indicating that ADHD as a diagnosis may not be linked to technology use.  I learned that as I was writing this post and was surprised by the finding.  https://www.psychcongress.com/article/has-easy-access-technology-increased-rates-adhd  Why?  I’ve seen it in my travels at work – children looking into computer screens-not acknowledging parents, becoming highly active with the rush of adrenalin-fueled by the use of the screen.   Digging further, I found this video    https://www.wsj.com/video/silicon-valley-renegades-take-on-tech-obsession/2D3A120C-C88F-4C81-A005-1439E464A507.html

What Can We Do Right Now to Positively Use Technology?In this upcoming second week of school vacation (at least in NYC, NY) there are some very useful apps that may be of help to use with your child.  When used, please consider the fact that you will want to implement their use under your supervision and guidance.https://ilslearningcorner.com/2015-09-15-kids-apps-for-learning-disabilities/?fbclid=IwAR2PGx4WLPViOnmxB6vFbCmpdtirsR293kzBThNHWy5ap7TvkHfmlo0cHu8

As well, you might want to include the use of age-appropriate school workbooks https://www.highlights.com/store/workbooks?gclid=CjwKCAiAuqHwBRAQEiwAD-zr3Zbarrj_KcVvfduGbsezrdoCgGZTzB2ARwgB-hm0_3Gc3040nL-75RoCIOEQAvD_BwEandr

and reading materials from the local library.

I’ve posted other potential activities that do not involve screen time so please scroll back for those and please don’t forget to look up at each other and look!

activity adult adventure backpacking
Photo by VisionPic .net on Pexels.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fussy Eating

by Claire Gillespie shared from The Week and via Fussy Eating — Pediatric Feeding News

The Truth about Fussy Eating by by Claire Gillespie shared from The Week It’s no big secret that a lot of kids don’t like vegetables. Or they think they don’t like them, because they don’t really know — they won’t try them. Another non-secret is that one of the most exhausting aspects of parenting isKeep…

 

 

There are serious sensory components to eating and these are illustrated through another remarkable post that was recently featured; well worth a look.  For example, the sensation for some may be illustrated with the following image.  https://wordpress.com/read/feeds/77902889/posts/2550462747

A Sensory Friendly Holiday

Changes in routine can affect children and think about how it affects you as well. All the excitement of the upcoming weeks is upon us and perhaps an overlooked thought is how to deal with your special needs family member.  Maybe it is foremost in your mind. It may be in that of your child as school holiday gatherings occur this or next week before school vacations.

PRE-PLANNING:  With credit to the Sensory Processing Disorder Parent Support Group which can be reached at the link below, I noted that although labeled for Xmas that many of the ideas could be adapted to suit your own family’s holiday celebrations.

The following is from https://sensoryprocessingdisorderparentsupport.com/tips-for-a-more-successful-sensory-christmas.php

Tips For A More Successful Sensory Christmas!  

 

1. Keep a routine as much as possible. Using visual schedules can be helpful so they know what is next. 


2. Enjoy short and simple activities.


3. It’s ok to have a personal family only Christmas.


4. If you do go out for Christmas, explain sensory challenges to everyone ahead of time.


5. Have a quiet room or space for your child to be alone when they get overwhelmed.


6. Take your child’s weighted blanket and sensory tools.


7. While you are out remember that it’s ok to leave early; watch your child’s signs.  


8. Shopping for children with SPD can be unbearable. Try to shop without them if possible or shop in smaller shops with less people.


9. Try to make Christmas day last for days or a week, not everything all on one day.


10. Most areas have a sensory Santa, it’s better to schedule a time as a visit to Santa can be too much for children with SPD.


11. If you are going out to dinner bring your child’s choice foods because most will not eat what is served for Christmas dinner.


12. Read social stories to prepare your child for Christmas events.


13. When you notice your child is coping well, praise them as much as possible.


14. Stick to your child’s sensory diet as much as possible during the holidays to keep them regulated. 

15. Allow time for scheduled sensory breaks and exercise.


16. Don’t forget your child’s noise-canceling headphones.


17. Bringing an IPad if they use one will be helpful to keep them busy or they could listen to earphones to avoid most noise.


18. Lower expectations as most children with SPD will have meltdowns during holiday events and dinners as they get overwhelmed.


19. If your child has several gifts, open them gradually so they don’t get overwhelmed.

(a few a day)


20. Include your child with decorating the tree but remember flashing lights or musical decorations can be too much for a child with SPD.


21. Keep Christmas decorations on the walls and in doorways limited and simple. Gradually add them to your home.


22. If your child doesn’t want to open gifts in front of others, try to respect that.


23. I know as a parent that you want your child to enjoy Christmas events but how everyone else enjoys it will be different from how your child enjoys it.


24. Before attending events, make a signal or sign that your child can use to let you know when it’s too much for them.


25. Don’t be afraid to say no to having visitors over. If you do have visitors it’s ok to have a time limit.


26. Don’t force the Christmas on your child that you want to have.


27. Let your child run, jump, spin or swing as much as they need too during the holidays.


28. Think of the human senses. Smells at Christmas can be strong, sounds can be too loud and lights can be too bright.

29. Less can be best. Too much of anything is usually going to be overwhelming.

30. Enjoy yourself! Have a glass of wine and have a Christmas that works for your family, it doesn’t need to work for everyone else!

If you are having a child over for Christmas dinner that has SPD or plan to attend an event with a child who has SPD….. PLEASE be understanding.

 

Toy Selection:  

A few posts ago, I wrote about some ideas for toy selection.  An article in my e-mail box is something to consider in terms of guidelines for teens and tweens especially with (NAON TECH) toys in mind

https://blog.asha.org/2016/11/29/10-non-tech-holiday-gift-ideas-to-promote-kids-language-learning/

The speech-language pathologist in me ran across a video in an e-journal disseminated to professional members of the national organization regarding the noise-factor produced by some of those toys that you might select

 

GIFT WRAPPING: 

The advantage of a sensory-friendly gift packaging with a novel and eco-friendly packaging options.  

  1.  The sound of wrapping paper may be noxious to some.  I searched for eco-friendly fabric gift bags and found these holiday-specific and general gift wrap ideas https://www.etsy.com/listing/254960158/custom-hanukkah-gift-bags-party-favor?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=fabric+gift+wrap+bags&ref=sr_gallery-1-28&pro=1

https://www.etsy.com/listing/717961454/christmas-fabric-gift-bag-in-traditional?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=fabric+gift+wrap+bags&ref=sr_gallery-1-21&cns=1

https://www.etsy.com/listing/707127055/fab-gift-bag?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=fabric+kwanza+gift+wrap+bags&ref=sc_gallery-1-13&plkey=146e719b1b76c2698fc21d6373933564e0af18c9%3A707127055&frs=1

For those who love textures and need stimulating gift wrap, Amazon had an idea when i searched there.  If you type the following:  textured+wrapping+holiday+paper+for+kids

Another idea would be to wrap gifts in colored bubble wrap.  Search online for your desired color.  If you have a gift that could fit into a bubble mailing envelope, that would be another alternative.

uBoxes, Red Bubble Small 3/16" Wrap x 12" Wide (30-Feet)  https://www.amazon.com/Red-Bubble-Small-Wrap-Wide/dp/B019ZU3KDO/ref=asc_df_B019ZU3KDO/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=198080987010&hvpos=1o3&hvnetw=g&hvrand=17620725630839429984&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9060354&hvtargid=pla-386417161357&psc=1

or blue:

https://www.amazon.com/Offitecture-Cushioning-Perforated-Stickers-Included/dp/B07TD4KB61/ref=sr_1_5?keywords=blue+bubble+wrap&qid=1576084346&s=office-products&sr=1-5l

Grass textured gift bags are another option

https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1CAFA_enUS777US777&sxsrf=ACYBGNSvzZH2LSijBOSblXAT6JgQk0W1pA:1576085470957&q=grass+texture+gift+bag&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjQ24b1j67mAhWOxFkKHf0wDfQQsAR6BAgIEAE&biw=1920&bih=888#imgrc=f9GOl9r39Q3fvM

Instead of a bow, put a card so that you know who the gift is from into a sensory bag such as this pencil case which may provide some sensory input afterwards

https://www.playtherapysupply.com/sensory/discreet-fidgets/sensory-bag?gclid=CjwKCAiAxMLvBRBNEiwAKhr-nGvVe6B0VlxQOmpUoks2BsrXQLnxq7p_Gb7tpht956lJUqBHYWkG2RoCCYwQAvD_BwE

If you want to use traditional gift wrap, perhaps attack a colorful squishy bag with a label indicating from whom the gift is

https://www.etsy.com/listing/725352973/colorful-squishy-bag-sensory-bag-texture?gpla=1&gao=1&&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=shopping_us_low-low_e-toys_and_games-toys-learning_and_school&utm_custom1=27272a7c-2672-4036-b680-03b8c430baf0&utm_content=go_6721326207_78232985694_388251268231_pla-352859725646_c__725352973&gclid=CjwKCAiAxMLvBRBNEiwAKhr-nLl5St30w4VJOqQTK7hxTIO7bQ640JoBdVtA-CuChOp3TjF778uBKxoCH10QAvD_BwE

I think that this gives you a fair amount of food for thought.  If you want to make a sensory bag, just search for that online. Etsy has some nice ideas for these.

Most of all – have a lovely time!

Play and Holidays

 

IMAGE |  EDIT

top view photography of toddler playing with toy

 

Parents ask – what can I get for my special needs child for the holidays.  The gift of sharing time and allowing for this experience is probably one of the most important.  This is well documented in the literature and even pediatricians have weighed in on the subject of play with children.

Play is important for communication development as the below blog author illustrates http://www.playingwithwords365.com/the-importance-of-play-for-speech-and-language-development/   and as you step into the shopping mall on Black Friday or you are selecting toys online consider these developmental stages in play development https://pathways.org/kids-learn-play-6-stages-play-development/.   The reason to consider this would be to make sure that your child can actually benefit from the toy being purchased,

Recognize that for children – anything can become a toy.  The box collection (by age) of 52 quick and creative idea cards is great for easy ones which can be a guide for fun activities.  If money is an issue for you – take a look. All the materials can be found at home:

If it is hard financially to purchase toys, you may wish to contact The Salvation Army for assistance.

TRADITIONAL TOYS:

To me, a traditional toy is one that is not battery operated.  I remember using these as a child. For example lincoln logs, building blocks, board puzzles, board games such as Monopoly, CandyLand, Pick Up Sticks or numerous doll teal parties with a tea set, balls, frisbees. There are many others and this site offers

https://funandfunction.com/  

https://www.target.com/s/non+battery+toys?ref=tgt_adv_XS000000&AFID=google&fndsrc=tgtao&CPNG=Toys_Dolls%2BPuppets%2BPlush%2BAction+Figures&adgroup=Animal+Figures_3&LID=700000001171643&LNM=non+battery+toys&MT=b&network=g&device=c&location=9067609&targetid=kwd-302805841827&ds_rl=1246978&ds_rl=1248099&gclid=Cj0KCQiAt_PuBRDcARIsAMNlBdpoEMMECWDQDfTaVdTipJsGvkDwed41JpN0uX-c9KZSZ5mCPxmFoLYaAuqgEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

The value of a traditional toy cannot be underestimated because the use o f these involves that of imagination expansion.  Here is some foood for additional thought https://www.greenchildmagazine.com/no-battery-gifts/

https://www.target.com/s/non+battery+toys?ref=tgt_adv_XS000000&AFID=google&fndsrc=tgtao&CPNG=Toys_Dolls%2BPuppets%2BPlush%2BAction+Figures&adgroup=Animal+Figures_3&LID=700000001171643&LNM=non+battery+toys&MT=b&network=g&device=c&location=9067609&targetid=kwd-302805841827&ds_rl=1246978&ds_rl=1248099&gclid=Cj0KCQiAt_PuBRDcARIsAMNlBdpoEMMECWDQDfTaVdTipJsGvkDwed41JpN0uX-c9KZSZ5mCPxmFoLYaAuqgEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

BATTERY OPERATED, ELECTRONIC OR TRADITIONAL TOYS:

One of my favorites is Melissa and Doug toys because they are very sturdy, last a long time and can be used in so many different ways as children grow.  A number are available on their website and here are some links on the site for those who want them toys for upcoming vacations with packing limitations: https://www.melissaanddoug.com/search/?q=puzzles%20for%20toddlers   or https://www.melissaanddoug.com/search/?q=puzzles+in+a+box&lang=default   

Other toys through Melissa and Doug are Sensory Friendly toys      as well as on these sites:

https://www.specialneedstoys.com/usa/holiday-gift-guide

Whichever toy you may choose to purchase, have fun!  Without realizing it you will be building memories that will last a lifetime!

Feeding Senses

  Picture from:     http://wisdomthroughmindfulness.blogspot.com/2010/03/

Continuing from the theme of earlier this week in terms of preparing for the holidays, part of doing so is to think about meals and what will be served, how many people are coming, what ingredients you will need and then cooking.  If you have a child who can’t tolerate eating different foods then YOU have an additional layer that is so emotionally ridden.  If you have a child who cannot tolerate the smell of foods cooking or the site of those which you have on the counter how will you prepare them?  Food is such a basic thing that we need for every day.  Working with parents each week with children who have feeding challenges reminds me of the emotional influence that problems in this area pose to families. Having taken Dr. Toomey’s training this past fall, I became aware of information that might be able to help you and I have already found its benefit during my daily practice. It is known as a sensory-based feeding therapy approach, building on each of them.  http://autism.sesamestreet.org/daily-routine-cards/?fbclid=IwAR0VKcWb_ZAHzheWdgT7ekqhwG_NuW8JLOMtCHZyT4PnolRXeyq6oeXxLSw

“The SOS Approach to Feeding program was developed by and copyrighted by Dr. Kay Toomey.  Please note, all materials, documents and forms taken from the SOS Approach to Feeding program are copyrighted and cannot be reproduced in any form without the written permission of Dr. Kay Toomey. For more information on the SOS Approach to Feeding program, please visit http://www.sosapproach.com.”     

This article can describe what can be done When-Children-Wont-Eat-Understanding-the-Whys-and-How-to-Help.pdf

and in her blog post, a parent relates how her child benefitted from its use https://singingthroughtherain.net/2013/03/tips-for-children-with-feeding-disorders.html

The SOS Feeding approach is appropriate for children that are “problem feeders” and not “picky eaters”, which can sometimes be difficult to distinguish between. Picky eaters are those that have a limited variety of foods and will not easily eat, but they often will reluctantly touch or taste new food. Picky eaters do not need SOS feeding therapy. A problem feeder, however, has an even more restricted variety of foods with more severe reactions to interacting with non-preferred foods and is a candidate for SOS feeding therapy. Here are some questions to consider if you are concerned about your child’s eating:

  • Does your child have a decreased range or variety of foods (less than 20)?
  • If your child gets “burned out” on food and takes a break from it, will they refuse that food still, after the break?
  • Does your child refuse entire categories of food groups (proteins, vegetables, etc.) or texture groups (hard foods, soft cubes, puree textures)?
  • Does your child almost always eat different foods at a meal than the rest of the family?
  • Have you reported concerns about your child’s feeding across multiple well-child check-ups?
  • If you answered “yes” to several of the above questions, talk to your child’s pediatrician about a referral for an evaluation to determine if feeding therapy would be warranted for your child.

Please note, the term “problem feeder” is used by the SOS Feeding approach program to delineate children who are outside the normal range of age-appropriate feeding behaviors, i.e. only being a “picky eater”.

Is your child a red flag for a referral?  Know that in this season of giving that you can be given the hope of improved ability to help your child enjoy eating!

Red-Flags-w-logo

Technology

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New and profound diagnostic terms are emerging that diagnose actual addiction in this area. It’s called “Internet Addiction Disorder” according to the diagnostic manual used by physicians and other healthcare professionals.  If you want the codes here they are: https://www.aihc-assn.org/Blog/tabid/1676/ArticleID/379/Internet-Addiction-A-Digital-Problem-in-the-Real-World.aspx

IAD will display distinct habits. According to the journal Current Psychiatry ReviewsTrusted Source, someone with an IAD will:

  • have mood changes
  • focus on the internet and digital media
  • be unable to control how much time they spend
  • need more time or a new game to be happy
  • show withdrawal symptoms when not using the internet or technology
  • continue using the internet or technology even when it affects their relationships
  • neglect their social, work, or school life

How it is diagnosed is complex. Here is a link  https://www.psycom.net/iadcriteria.html for you so consider your own habits and that of the medical community https://www.aihc-assn.org/Blog/tabid/1676/ArticleID/379/Internet-Addiction-A-Digital-Problem-in-the-Real-World.aspx. Can you list 25 things that you do each day that does not involve technology?  I asked a group of graduate students studying to become speech-language pathologists and they had trouble.  How about you?

There are good and unfortunate impacts that technology has had to date based on a variety of sources.  Think about the last time that you tried to talk to someone to find that they could not answerer you. They had earbuds in their ears, were not looking up at you – just at a machine and appeared to be in an entirely non-face-to face world.  The effect on communication in this century is both astounding and profoundly changing us.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/04/health/screen-time-lower-brain-development-preschoolers-wellness/index.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=fbCNN&utm_content=2019-11-04T22%3A00%3A09&utm_term=link&fbclid=IwAR2kl7JF5e1BDeY6-j-BGQiGqpT1t5BA4dVM4yVIpZsbSpNZ7pZRuopXkQ0

https://www.today.com/video/screen-time-may-be-reshaping-preschoolers-brains-new-study-says-72848453586?fbclid=IwAR0rorh-QKQcF0r8KFkYOmmSK9DGoQbP2CkRXT-1RhYg0qywY8lGoQDwrxo

https://www-nytimes-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.nytimes.com/2019/11/04/well/family/screen-use-tied-to-childrens-brain-development.amp.html

https://blog.asha.org/2020/01/17/asha-president-is-parents-smartphone-use-the-new-secondhand-smoke/

GOOD NEWS!

The good news is that there are positive things that we can use computers for, as noted in an example of a few resources below. There are others if you search by grade level which yields similar listings so look at those as well.

https://download.cnet.com/news/best-apps-to-educate-and-entertain-preschool-and-kindergarten-age-kids/

28 of the Best Apps for Kids in the First Grade

American Academy of Pediatrics advises families is that used in moderation can be helpful.  https://www.aap.org/en-us/advocacy-and-policy/aap-health-initiatives/Pages/Media-and-Children.aspx    History is repeating itself. The transition from oral to written language posed challenges for those living through that period.  We all need to embrace the change and recognize that things are not all bad with this new change in communication.

Halloween with a Special Needs Child

Halloween is tomorrow! Are you ready??

Typically families with young children may be approaching them with excitement. In my experience, families with children who have disabilities may have apprehensions. How can you proactively approach Halloween? How can your family prepare for dealing with stimulating settings and create a more meaningful/less stressful day in this Halloween week? Here are some resources that may be of help. Firstly:

Here is a wonderful blog post with suggestions for reducing stimulation, creating costumes and preparing for the big day www.familyeducation.com .

Do you want to have a party indoors with snacks and decorations. Perhaps kids movies www.halloweenmoviesforkid would be a nice activity

Literacy is an area of interest to those of us in the area of speech-language pathology. Here is a link to some books with the Halloween theme https://www.google.com/search?q=halloween+books&rlz=1C1CAFA_enUS777US777&oq=halloween+books&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.2855j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

The best of all may be arts and crafts that are thematic for the holiday so that you can spend face time with eachother and be creative. Here is a link for some quick and easy activities to give you some ideas https://crazylittleprojects.com/halloween-crafts-for-kids/

Have fun!

SPD Awareness Month

 

This month is another “Awareness” month. We not only become aware of ADHD but one of the concomitant conditions: Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD).

The need to have an understanding of the sameness and difference between the conditions is very important as it can have an impact on planning for treatment and perhaps the type of testing that needs to be done. According to the STAR Institute

“many of these kids have both disorders. A national stratified sample of children suggests that 40% of children with ADHD also have SPD (Ahn, Miller et. … Causes: In very simple terms, ADHD and SPD are both disorders that impact the brain. “.

STAR Institute doesn’t talk about adults, but I cannot imagine that there is not a large population of adults who have ADHD + SPD as well…

The discrete differences according to the STAR Institute are found at https://www.spdstar.org/node/1114

Being empowered with knowledge and having that increased awareness about individual differences will only help us as individuals -neuro-typical or not to interact with one another. That I believe is the goal of awareness months- so it behooves us all to take a look.

How to Recognize a Sensory Processing Disorder in Your Child | ilslearningcorner.com #sensoryprocessing #sensoryplay

Taken from the below-noted website, you can both read more about SPD and obtain this “sensory processing chart without cost:

https://ilslearningcorner.com/2015-10-how-to-recognize-a-sensory-processing-disorder-in-your-child/?fbclid=IwAR2pUGvV3vYYIbYqtt3zY68GocZPbEKSsEfKzV8fFN6i0-lDLxyZLZo-NAg

SPD Awareness Month

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